Testing at the Crime Scene, Part 3

In this third post to the crime scene series, we’re going to continue using our crime scene techniques by adding an extra complexity dimension to what we started in the second post. We’re then going to try our analysis on a much larger code base than any we’ve looked at so far. So put on your detective hat and let’s dive in!

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Testing at the Crime Scene, Part 2

Following on from the first post in this series, we’ll leverage the forensic techniques we started with and apply those to a code crime scene in an effort to understand where we might have some quality concerns. And we’ll even try to aid our analysis a bit with some visualizations. So let’s dive in!

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Testing at the Crime Scene, Part 1

As human beings working in complex situations, like software, we know that we vary quite a bit in our abilities. That’s the case whether we’re testers or programmers or analysts. Any role that provides cognitive friction around these complex situations will amplify variations in our abilities. That’s why you have certain developers that are better at some things than others; likewise with testers. That variation impacts quality and how we look for it. So let’s dig in to this a bit.

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The Ethical Mandate for Mistake Specialists

In my post Forgetting How to Test, I said “we are at a time where forgetting how to test is not just a technical dilemma, but an ethical and moral dilemma.” I still believe that. Here I’ll try to show a bit of how test thinking should lead us inexorably to that idea.

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Testing Like It Was 1980

In the past I’ve discussed the idea of being able to recover context by test thinking. Here I want to reframe that idea a bit by recovering the context of what automation was like in the early 1980s. I think it’s important for testers to know their history. So let’s dive back to the 80s where, to quote Back to the Future, “we don’t need roads” — but we did need tests!

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An Epic Story About Retro-Gaming

In my previous post on product management, I focused on the overall product context in which a story workflow could occur. I mentioned a follow-on post that would get a little more granular regarding that workflow and this is that post. Here we’ll discuss epics, stories, and tasks and I’ll discuss these concepts in relation to a personal project I’m working on. So let’s dive in!

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Product Mapping and Quality Insight

Previously I talked about project management and a quality focus. Here I want to take both down a level to get a little more practical, specifically around the idea of how that quality focus strongly encourages delivery teams to create product maps. It’s those product maps that will give a team the first insights into what quality is going to look like.

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Product Management and the Quality Focus

In a series of posts I talked about product development. But now let’s dig in a little to the idea of product management. Although not often framed as such, product management is very much an area of quality assurance. The intersection is crucial in the modern technology industry.

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Testing at the Horizons of Quality

The notion of quality can be a complicated concept. Quality can be very situational and that very circumstantial nature of quality tends to happen at the horizon, where various aspects come together and meet. So let’s do a (very) deep dive into this with one of my favorite examples: game testing.

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The Shape of Testing

I recently talked about the idea of testing being part geometry and part topology. What might not have been conveyed through that post, however, is how powerful the notion of shape is. What’s particularly interesting about shape is also how we can determine shape by how we choose to observe something. And testing is very much about observing. So let’s dig into this particular rabbit hole.

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