The Evolution of Testing

There is a relatively common sentiment that tester roles, as opposed to the testing activity, should disappear entirely. We see that a bit with descriptions of jobs like “Software Development Engineer in Test” (SDET) which basically just means “developer who can test” rather than “tester who can develop.” Is this evolution necessarily an unhealthy one? Let’s talk about this.

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Testing Is The Art Of …

The title of this post indicates a sentiment you’ll often see. “Testing is the art of …” and then fill in some word or phrase. While I get the intent behind this, the word or phrase used to complete the sentence is often a bit lacking and actually reinforces the opinion that many have of testing, which is that it’s not a distinct enough discipline.

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Testers and Data Science, Part 1

I’ve talked a bit about testers and AI as well as testers and machine learning. Here I want to focus a bit on one area that can be a basis for both of those areas: data science. As a tester, you don’t need to be a data scientist. But it certainly doesn’t hurt to have a grounding in what data scientists do. Here we’ll do some exploratory computing with Jupyter; we’ll use some numerical and visualization libraries and we’ll explore the (fascinating?) world of Pokémon data. So let’s take a few posts to dig into this.

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Testers and the Bug Hunting Focus

What do people tend to think of when they hear “tester”? More specifically, what do they think a person called “tester” primarily does? Arguably, more often than not, you’re going to hear something like “a tester’s role is to find bugs” or “a tester helps surface issues.” As an approximation, that may be accurate. But it’s only a very rough approximation. And a dangerous one. So let’s talk about this.

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Wherefore the Death of “Manual Testing”

I see so many people lately talking about the “death of manual testing.” Opinions obviously polarize on this but what I don’t see is testers engaging at all with why this perception is there. There is a form of indoctrination that happens across the industry. And testers, by and large, do nothing to combat it. Largely because they ignore where it’s coming from. Let’s talk about this a bit.

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