Delivery Teams and Popping the What Stack

Product developers know about the “Why Stack” and it’s important that developers and testers are able to work in this context. So let’s talk about this a bit … although I should note I’m going to refine a little bit about how the “Why Stack” is considered, moving it a bit more into where it intersects with how we think about features that we want to develop and test.

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Product Development Injections

Recently I had a chance to get back into my product development and product management roots. I do believe that quality assurance, and testing, are highly aligned with product management. So in a series of posts I will talking about some of that alignment, often focused on some key concepts. Here I’ll talk about the idea of “injections” that make sense in the context of product management.

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The Zero Defect Fallacy

Thankfully most testers that I come across do realize that the notion of having “zero defects” is, in fact, a fallacy. But this notion of something being “defect free” still persists in the wider industry. And it’s important to quash that perception. How I frame this when encountering the thought differs a bit. So here I’ll give a brief overview of various ways I respond.

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Forgetting How To Test

My original title for this post was “Thinking Clearly About Automation” but I realized there was a wider ambit to that discussion. We have a technocracy that likes to turn testing into a programming problem, suggesting that “manual testing” (testing done by humans) should be automated away as much as possible. That’s a danger. Some testers have combated this by suggesting automation has nothing to do with testing. I believe that’s also a danger.

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Testers: Act Like a Developer

We often say testers have to “think like an architect” or “think like a builder” or, perhaps even, “think like a developer.” Here’s the problem: to actually think like any one of these people, you have to try to do something they do. So, really, you have to act like a developer. Let’s talk about this and where the testing relevance comes in.

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Recovering Context by Test Thinking

Here I’m going to write one of my posts that I think are the most fun but are probably the ones that many testers struggle with in terms of seeing how (or even whether) I’m being relevant. I want to talk a little about an aspect of testing that I think is consistently underused and consistently undersold in the industry: recovering a context that has been buried under years of major and minor decisions.

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